Dating friendship


15-Oct-2017 16:08

Teen dating violence affects both males and females, and the damage the violence causes has profound consequences.

These consequences can follow the victim throughout their lives.

Gone are the lunch breaks with colleagues, the conversations by the coffee machine. It’s not that I don’t have friends, but, as we settle down, we see less of one another.

Several now live abroad, and plenty have moved to other parts of the UK.

I reply, gushing about how much I love the States, but then hear nothing back. Still, I persevere for a few days and by midweek, I have plans to meet three women. It feels, somehow, as though there’s more at stake than there would be with a romantic date.

I worry that I might disappoint, or run out of things to say. The auburn-haired figure with the shy smile is Johanna, a 32-year-old mature student I message on Citysocializer, and my first friendship date.

Earlier this year, I left my job at a newspaper to go freelance.

Having spent the best part of a decade in an office, I’m now working from home. At the same time, the past few years have seen my non-work social group dwindle.

Become empowered, learn about teen dating violence and strategies for protection and prevention.

We already use the internet to find romantic partners. That’s all fine in theory, but I’ve not gone looking for friends since university freshers’ week and find myself gripped by the same anxieties.

I agonise over my profile picture and consider taking a selfie before deciding it’ll look too staged.

Visit Understanding Teen Dating Violence for more information.

Love should never hurt, but statistics show 1 in 3 teens are the victim of teen dating violence.

As we leave the restaurant, we hug goodbye and promise to keep in touch. After one week of friendship dates, I’ve learnt several valuable lessons.